Put Those Oscars Back Where They Came From or So Help Me!

Put Those Oscars Back Where They Came From or So Help Me!

  • Comments 33

 I didn't watch the Academy Awards telecast on Sunday this year. Or last year. Or the year before.

Never mind that as the online editor for Plugged In, I really do need to know who won, what was said and how things went. I just couldn't bring myself to care about all that until first thing Monday morning.

It's just not watchable anymore.

And it's not just because I have a tweenage daughter I'm trying my hardest to raise right in a world saturated with wrong. It's me, too.

I used to watch pretty much every single year. You know, during those Billy Crystal days of yore. It wasn't the absolute cleanest five-and-a-half hours on TV even back then, of course. But it wasn't even close to what's passing for award-show "greatness" now.

Didn't catch it yourself this year? Read a few lines of our Culture Clip describing what happened:

[Host Seth] MacFarlane sang and danced with the Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles as they paid "tribute" to actresses who'd gone topless onscreen in a song called "We Saw Your Boobs." That was followed by the host donning a nun's habit to tell Sally Field how hot he thought she was as Gidget and The Flying Nun. He joked about Lincoln's assassination (a gag that earned gasps from the audience), described Django Unchained as a good date-night movie for Chris Brown and Rihanna (more gasps), quipped about Jews running Hollywood and took a bunch of potshots at other celebs.

Industry veteran Nikki Fink live-blogged after the spiel, "You have to excuse me. That show opening was so lousy, I'm still in a state of shock and dismay." Entertainment publicist Angie Meyer told Fox News, "Seth McFarlane spoon-fed sexism and likewise innuendo through song, setting a terrible example for young children watching the show. … The Oscars are supposed to be a celebration of the art of cinema, not a tribute to women who strip down in film."

So … my family watched The Cosby Show on Hulu instead. And we laughed and giggled and goofed around … with nary a single thought reserved for Mr. MacFarlane or Mr. Oscar.

Question: What happens to Hollywood when everybody else's family starts following my family's example right around the end of February every year?

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Comments
  • ya i am 16 and i do not like seth mcfarlane

  • I really enjoyed the oscars show this year, minus the innuendo.  I knew before watching that it was hosted by the creator of Family Guy, so I expected the off-color jokes.  Besides the crude skits and some of the jokes, I thought it was well done.  MacFarlane did a fine job of hosting the show, and I loved that the oscars had a musical theme this year.  Who knew that MacFarlane had a fine singing voice?  I sure didn't.  Other musical numbers were also impressive, and the von trapp family joke was hilarious.  I was also really impressed with Ted the teddy bear presenting one of the awards, it left me baffled about how a cgi object was on a live show.  (Later I learned it was prerecorded and cleverly edited)  I'll conclude by saying that this show could have been family friendly if they just left out the off-color jokes.  It still was enjoyable though.  

  • I had low expectations of Seth McFarlane because of his Family Guy ties (not to mention he has some big shoes to fill in the form of previous comedian host Bob Hop) but I was pleasantly surprised with what I found. Yeah, some of the jokes were really off color, but that's to be expected. Better than some of the more recent hosts by far.

  • I watch the Oscars pretty much every year because there's usually a movie/person that I'm rooting for. MacFarlene did a good job as host, in my opinion. Then again, I'm 22 and not a stickler for ''family-friendliness''.

  • Certainly not the best (billy crystal!) but not the worst host either (remember Anne Hathaway and James Franco from two years back?!) . It was genuinely mediocre with enough funny bits to keep me from nodding off during the way too long ceremony.

  • I never watch these things. Personally, I don't agree with enough of Hollywood to bother. You have to sorta expect innuendo etc. After all it is Hollywood.

    Joy

  • I DVRed it and fast-forwarded to the Les Miserables cast performance and watched that several times. Then deleted the rest of the show.

  • I haven't watched it since the Franco/Hathaway disaster. It's just not worth watching through all the crud.

  • I watched this year, because it can be kind of a fun 'event' thing for me. Prior to this year I hadn't watched since 2008 (when they actually dared to acknowledge a quality performance in a comic-based film by posthumously honoring Heath Ledger for his portrayal of the Joker in "The Dark Knight"). I got so disgusted with Hollywood's corrupt agendas outweighing their efforts to honor quality art that I jumped ship for a few years. They definitely haven't changed too much in terms of the messages they are pushing and the subsequent biases they are exhibiting ("Life Of Pi" swept almost every category it was nominated in, and whether you personally liked the movie or not (and I am not waving my finger or anything), objectively one must admit that the film preaches some pretty unclean ideas (particularly about spirituality)).

    Re:the topless actresses song: "Paid "tribute""? Seemed more like an awkward, goofy 'wall of shame' to me. I didn't get the impression they were cheering for them so much as pointing out that certain actresses *cough*Kate Winslet*cough* have bared themselves to the camera quite regularly. Not a 'family friendly' segment, to be sure, but the article from which you quote seems to think they were all but saying "booyah, give us some more of that action!", which I didn't get from it. Maybe it's just me.

    And yeah, that whole Gay Men's Chorus Of Los Angeles thing bothered me a lot. I really thought (and sincerely hoped) that MacFarlane was joking when he first said that they were a gay chorus, but I quickly realized he was serious. That was, in some ways, the darkest point of the show for me. That and the couple really distasteful jabs he took (one at Lincoln, one at Christians ("he's a boy wizard and she's a girl vampire, so together they are pretty much everything the Christian right says is wrong with Hollywood today"), and a couple quasi-anti-semetic jokes while Walhberg and 'Ted' were on-stage).

    On the other hand, I was proud of Wahlberg for not administering any of the inappropriate remarks and for announcing once more (in front of an auditorium full of revered peers and on the TV's of countless families) that he is Catholic.

    I was also really happy Les Mis got any loving at all, awards wise (even if I feel it was still severely under appreciated), and the cast performance choked me up, just as the film itself did (and more).

    Additionally, I thought MacFarlane had some hilarious, witty jokes ("The Sound Of Music" joke, his line when introducing the cast of "The Avengers" ("The Avengers was the most successful film of the year, which is why it was only nominated ONCE.") (The cast themselves had some pretty hilarious back-and-forth as well). And I pretty much keeled over laughing at the sock puppet parody of "Flight" (a movie that I really enjoyed despite its bad press and the occasional bumps in its content road).

    I was also happy that they included Michael Clarke Duncan in their "In Memoriam" segment, as I thought he was an excellent actor and seemed like a very nice, real person.

    So will I watch again next year? MAYBE. I would say probably, but that depends largely on which films get pushed and hyped throughout this year, because watching them assault us with their support of unclean worldviews REALLY can detract from the fun of the overall experience.

  • We watched the Oscars. And we laughed. Because it was hilarious and true, every last word of it.

  • "He's a boy wizard and she's a girl vampire, so together they are pretty much everything the Christian right says is wrong with Hollywood today."

    Truest quote ever spoken by anyone on the Oscars. You really can't deny it.

  • Skipped it. Watched the final Batman movie instead. Caught up in two minutes the next morning. No big loss.

  • "He's a boy wizard and she's a girl vampire, so together they are pretty much everything the Christian right says is wrong with Hollywood today."

    --- I actually thought this was a funny joke. It's kind of true, and your reaction kind of proves his point. Some Christians can't take a joke, and are generally uptight.

    ''I got so disgusted with Hollywood's corrupt agendas outweighing their efforts to honor quality art that I jumped ship for a few years. They definitely haven't changed too much in terms of the messages they are pushing and the subsequent biases they are exhibiting ("Life Of Pi" swept almost every category it was nominated in, and whether you personally liked the movie or not (and I am not waving my finger or anything), objectively one must admit that the film preaches some pretty unclean ideas (particularly about spirituality)).''

    ----I disagree. I don't think Hollywood is pushing any ''message'', Life of Pi was adapted from a book. It wasn't dreamed up by Ang Lee or any other filmmaker. Also, you must admit that you're equally biased in your ideas, and saying ''objectively'' does not remove the bias. Your sense of what is unclean is biased by your religious beliefs of what is or isn't clean. Just because you disagree with the author of Life of Pi does not make your conclusion accurate.

  • I enjoyed the Oscars mainly because I love movies, I'm 16 and i thought they were actually appropriate this year. I muted the "We Saw your Boobs" song, and I wasn't exactly surprised when Seth MacFarlane made those groaner jokes. If you invite a man who's famous for offensive humor in his TV shows and movies then don't be surprised when he makes those kinds of jokes. Those are my thoughts, but I don't blame you for not watching it. I'm just interested in that kind of thing because I want to be a movie director when I grow up, and hopefully if I do become a famous director i hope to make movies that you Pluggedin will approve of.  

  • I don't really see what the problem with the reference to Jews in Hollywood was. I found it funny because this industry WAS founded by immigrants, Jews, and women, three groups who at the beginning of the twentieth century didn't have as many opportunities as other groups did. I found it funny because it was a reference to flm history for me (then again, one of my favorite songs in Monty Python's Spamalot is You Won't Succeed on Broadway).

    And the best joke of the evening was by far the nod to The Sound of Music. It took me a few seconds to realize what he was doing, but it was absolute gold!